Buggy

Continuing with my catch-up efforts, the next installment of photos.  Yep!  All about bugs.  Sure, some are not technically bugs, but you get the idea.  Disclaimer . . . these photos are  not as good as the ones in the “preview” post.  Suck it up; you can’t have top drawer stuff all the time.

First up, a West Coast Lady butterfly.

It looks a tad beat up.

It looks a tad beat up.

This is not the same butterfly or from the set of photos I previewed in my  “preview” post.  Different Butterfly, and these are not as clear as I would like because, you guessed it, of the wind.

These butterflies look like they have an expression of surprise . . . or maybe, terror.

These butterflies look like they have an expression of surprise . . . or maybe, terror.

I did manage a couple of decent shots, of which the following is my favorite.

Face to face.

Face to face.

You know how people sometime equate beauty with butterflies?  Well, not so much.

Next up, our perennial standby, the Goldenrod  Crab spider.  Funny how once I saw one, I keep seeing them all over the place.  This one appeared in black and white in the off color post.  Here he (she?) is in full color.

No one is going to equate this thing with "beauty".

No one is going to equate this thing with “beauty”.

Not only did I see adults, but I saw a number of juveniles on other plants.  Here is one that sat there, apparently not minding me getting in its face.  This looks like a Northern Crab spider.

This spider was very small.

This spider was very small.

It only looks big because I was very close.

It only looks big because I was very close.

It looks even larger once I crop the photo for a close-up.

It looks even larger once I crop the photo for a close-up.

This is a bee shot I left out of the bee post.  Probably a carpenter bee.  See the little tool-belt, and the hammer loop on its hind leg?  No?  Well, it’s some sort of bee.  If it’s not a Carpenter bee, maybe it’s a Tony Orlando and Dawn bee.

it bee ugly . . . get it? Bee ugly . . . never mind.

it bee ugly . . . get it? Bee ugly . . . never mind.

Back to spiders . . . Doh!!  I mean, back to Harvestman, specifically the Eastern Harvestman (at least that’s what it looks like).  Also called a Daddy Long-legs, it’s not technically a spider.

Eastern Harvestman

Eastern Harvestman

Next, a quick series about two bugs.  I cannot say for sure, but I believe these were clandestine lovers.  I mean, what are the odds that of all the Stella D’Oro lilies blooming, these two would choose the same one?

First there was one . . .

First there was one . . .

. . . then the other one shows up.

. . . then the other one shows up.

See how they ignore each other?  . . . up to something, for sure.

See how they ignore each other? . . . up to something, for sure.

That larger one is a Tarnished Plant Bug . . .

Here's a better photo of the Tarnished Plant Bug.

Here’s a better photo of the Tarnished Plant Bug.

The name is odd . . . I don’t rightly know if it refers to the coloring of the bug, or that the plant it’s on is tarnished.  Meaning that, since English is not may native language, I am often fooled; is the adjective modifying the word “plant” or the word “bug”?  Or should the words “plant bug” be considered a unit, and modified as such by the adjective “tarnished”.

Idle minds ponder the matter, and then get distracted by the yogurt they are enjoying.

Here's one of the other bug.

Here’s one of the other bug.

I don’t know what this is, so I’ll make up my own name: Golden Resplendent Promiscuous Bug.  Goldie, for short.

The Stella D’Oro lilies are popular spots for bugs . . .

Little green /gold fly.

Little green /gold fly.

This is one of the Long-legged Flies (Condylostylus species).  A very neat-looking fly.  It reminds me of the Lexx . . . although upon closer examination, maybe not.

Same flower, same fly, different treatment.

Same flower, same fly, different treatment.

This looks to be another plant tarnished by the bug, or a tarnished bug on a plant, or plant and bug both tarnished.

The light was really bright, and I obviously did not mind the exposure.  I could not recover as much detail as I wanted . . . and as always, the wind did not help.

The light was really bright, and I obviously did not mind the exposure. I could not recover as much detail as I wanted . . . and as always, the wind did not help.

Actually, that is not  Tarnished Plant Bug.  It looks more like it belongs to the LYGAEOIDS  group of bugs, which include the so-called Big-eyed bugs, which I believe this one to be . . . but I could be wrong.  I remember once, in the last millennium, I was wrong about being wrong, so I would not bank on me being wrong here.

And now, on to the Mighty Ant (the Silky Ant).

This looks to me to be the equivalent of me trying to move a fridge on my own.

This looks to me to be the equivalent of me trying to move a fridge on my own.

I can't quite make out what it's dragging . . .

I can’t quite make out what it’s dragging . . .

Looks like a piece of barbeque beef.

Looks like a piece of barbeque beef.

The interesting thing is that I’ve not barbequed for a while . . . that ant must have dragged it from our neighbors . . . a good 80 yards away.  Impressive. 

I will end with the Long-legged Fly in a different setting.

I think I will retract my objection . . . it does look like the Lexx.

I think I will retract my objection . . . it does look like the Lexx.

Once again, I don’t feel like linking each individual photo to the corresponding full-size photo at SmugMug.  Those few who are interested can click HERE to visit the gallery of these photos.

Thanks for stopping by to peruse my stuff.

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Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not personally hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.  

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About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in ants, Butterflies, Daddy Long Legs, Goldenrod Crab Spider, Macro Photography, Photography, Photography Stuff, Spiders, Spiders and Insects, Stella D'Oro Lily, West Coast Lady and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to Buggy

  1. These are great. The little white spider is amazing. Love the details and colors.

  2. Emily Heath says:

    I actually find the crab spider quite cute! She has pretty markings.

    • disperser says:

      Visually interesting, is my take on them. Can’t get all the way to “cute”. But I am fascinated by their eye-pod. Get it? iPod ==> eye-pod? Never mind.

      I had never sees a spider with such an arrangement of eyes, separated as they are from the rest of the body. The body looks a bit “ugh”, but the eyes and the crab-like stance are fascinating to me.

  3. I have got to ask about your camera and settings. I never get close up shots to look this good without taking multiple shots and tweaking things repeatedly. And even then it feels like more of a luck based thing than anything relating to skill.

    • disperser says:

      I have listed all my equipment . . . er . . . all the camera stuff I own, but it’s in comments. I get enough questions that I will do a post specifically about the equipment, and maybe combine it with my typical processing of photos.

      But I got to tell you that, like in writing, there is no one thing or simple formula. By trial and error you learn what might work with each situation. Still, there are some common things that are applicable to most situations, and I’ll try and capture them.

      Note: there is a lot of information on the web about how to shoot various stuff. I do some of that, but because I am not as dedicated a photographer as I ought to be, I tend to pick and choose, and tweak stuff to accommodate the amount of effort I want to put into the hobby.

  4. Paul says:

    I’m not usually into flower or bug shots but your commentary kept me interested and places this post quite a few notches over and above the rest I’ve seen. Excellent job!

    • disperser says:

      Thanks. I try to provide interesting commentary in proportions inverse to the quality of the pictures. This was a middle of the road commentary.

      If I ever post really crappy photos, you’ll see something special in the way of commentary.

  5. Your bugs are great and the commentary very entertaining. I wish I’d see some interesting bugs like your spider. I kinda like the tarnished plant bug too.

    • disperser says:

      Thanks. For some reason, this year the two kind of plants that attracted most of the bugs were the Salvia plants, and the Stella D’Oro lilies. On any given day I could go out there and find a good mix of bugs.

  6. seekraz says:

    Incredible detail, Emilio…very nice.

  7. Carissa says:

    Gorgeous photos, as always. You have far more patience than I do, that’s for sure!

  8. Rachael says:

    A very enjoyable set of shots. I particularly liked the crab spider.

  9. AnnMarie says:

    Well done, bro! I’ve commented on my favorites in the SmugMug gallery. Enjoyed your narrative/commentary, as usual.

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