The Busy Bees – Summer 2012

For some reason, this year the bees went nuts on the Russian Sage.

For some reason, this year the bees went nuts on the Russian Sage.

It's odd, because these flowers are so small . . .

It’s odd, because these flowers are so small . . .

. . . maybe they produce a high volume of nectar.

. . . maybe they produce a high volume of nectar.

But, because the flowers are small, the bee don't seem to stay on them long.

But, because the flowers are small, the bee don’t seem to stay on them long.

If one is, for example, a photographer, then one gets frustrated by repeated captures of blurry shapes some may describe as lens smudges.

If one is, for example, a photographer, then one gets frustrated by repeated captures of blurry shapes some may describe as lens smudges.

But sometime you get a bee which seems mesmerized with the bounty within the flowers, and you can get a decent shot.

But sometime you get a bee which seems mesmerized with the bounty within the flowers, and you can get a decent shot.

But most of the time, even if at first glance the shot looks good, the little busy bees are blurred.

But most of the time, even if at first glance the shot looks good, the little busy bees are blurred.

To date, meaning the last 7 summers we have lived here, this is my only reasonably clear shot of a flying bee. Well, almost clear.

To date, meaning the last 7 summers we have lived here, this is my only reasonably clear shot of a flying bee. Well, almost clear.

This shot I like . . . sharp flower, sharp bee, decent composition . . .

This shot I like . . . sharp flower, sharp bee, decent composition . . .

. . . but the moment it realized what it had done, given me a decent shot, this bee takes off all pissed, and stuff.

. . . but the moment it realized what it had done, given me a decent shot, this bee takes off all pissed, and stuff.

Contrast this shot on Salvia flowers . . . the bees sit on there for a good while.

Contrast this shot on Salvia flowers . . . the bees sit on there for a good while.

I get giddy when I get shots like these. Yes, I know . . . giddiness is not very manly.

I get giddy when I get shots like these. Yes, I know . . . giddiness is not very manly.

Now, with Bee Balm flowers, the search for nectar becomes an adventure . . .

Now, with Bee Balm flowers, the search for nectar becomes an adventure . . .

Yes, a movie . . . not an Oscar winner, or even a contender, but at least I remembered the damn option. Sorry for the shifting focus . . . Hand held, and the lens was on auto-focus.

Thanks for stopping by.  I hope the visit was the bee’s wax.

Almost forgot; click HERE for the SmugMug gallery.

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About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Bee, Macro Photography, My YouTube, Photography, Photography Stuff, Spiders and Insects, YouTube Stuff and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to The Busy Bees – Summer 2012

  1. Oh wow, those are fantastic. Love the details on the bees wings on the clear shots.

  2. Emily Heath says:

    You know I love the bee shots. As well as producing lots of nectar the Russian sage probably produces a high sugar concentration nectar – for a bee, it’s all about how much sugar is in there. Some flowers are much harder to photograph them on than others. I find they spend a long time on thistles – perhaps something to plant in your back yard!

    • disperser says:

      I’ve wondered about making a bee-feeder (to keep them away from hummingbird feeders).

      And yes, the flower’s stability affects one’s ability to photograph the bees feeding on it. The sage moves at the slightest breeze, so it can get frustrating, especially here where there never seems to be an absence of it.

      As for thistle . . . they are all over the place, so the fight is to keep them off my yard (confession . . . there are a few places I let them grow; I happen to like the flowers a lot).

      • Emily Heath says:

        You shouldn’t really be encouraging bees to visit communal feeders as this can spread disease; also they are better off finding natural pollen and nectar sources which will contain more minerals. We feed sugar syrup at certain times of the year when not much forage is available, but only ever within the hive. Great that you have lots of thistles about!

  3. Some really astonishing shots here! And yes, Real Men can get giddy any time they like.

  4. Carissa says:

    The shot you like? I like it too. Bees are hard little critters to get right.

  5. Pingback: Syrup for the bees, cakes for us | Adventuresinbeeland's Blog

  6. sash says:

    and, these are fantastic! Composition is good too.

  7. AnnMarie says:

    BEE-UTIFUL shots! Need I say more? Well, actually, yes, since I wanted to add that the shot of the flying bee is very good. Emilio strikes again!

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